Mitz

The Marmoset of Bloomsbury

by Sigrid Nunez

List Price: $15.95
Paperback | 5.5 x 8.25 inches | ISBN 9781593765828

Order Ships 08/06/2019

Or Buy From Indiebound

By the National Book Award–winning author of The Friend

In 1934, a “sickly pathetic marmoset” named Mitz came into the care of Leonard Woolf. After he nursed her back to health, she became a ubiquitous presence in Bloomsbury society. Moving with Leonard and Virginia Woolf between their homes in London and Sussex, she developed her own special relationship with each of them, as well as with their pet cocker spaniels and with various members of the Woolfs’ circle, among them T. S. Eliot and Vita Sackville-West. Mitz also helped the Woolfs escape a close call with Nazis during a trip through Germany just before the outbreak of World War II. Using letters, diaries, memoirs, and other archival documents, Nunez reconstructs Mitz’s life against the background of Bloomsbury’s twilight years. This tender and imaginative mock biography offers a striking look at the lives of writers and artists shadowed by war, death, and mental breakdown, and at the solace and amusement inspired by its tiny subject. A new edition, with an afterword by Peter Cameron and a never-before-published letter about Mitz by Nigel Nicolson.

In short, glistening sentences that refract the larger world, Ms. Nunez describes the appealingly eccentric, fiercely intelligent Woolfs during a darkening time.

 
The Wall Street Journal
1/27

Graceful, respectful, and achingly honest.

 
Kirkus Reviews
2/27

An uncompromising talent.

 
Vogue
3/27

A writer of uncommon talent.

 
The New York Times Book Review
4/27

[Sigrid Nunez’s] spare voice . . . gives even the simplest descriptions of place and weather unsettling force and beauty.

 
The Village Voice
5/27

Nunez’s voice is unflinching and intimate.

 
Entertainment Weekly
6/27

[Nunez] takes us beneath the surface to the essential mysteries of the human heart.

 
The Wall Street Journal
7/27

[Sigrid Nunez’s] writing is rich and subtly textured.

 
Star-Tribune (Minneapolis)
8/27

Nunez’s piercing intelligence and post-feminist consciousness may well feel that writing the Great American novel is no longer a feasible or worthwhile goal—but damned if she hasn’t gone and done it anyway.

 
Salon
9/27

Remarkable . . . We know immediately we are in the hands of a major talent able to open up a complex history for us . . . [Nunez’s] gift is wild and large.

 
San Francisco Chronicle
10/27

Nunez’s writing is gorgeously spare.

 
The Boston Globe
11/27

When the apocalypse comes, I want Nunez in my life-boat.

 
Vanity Fair
12/27

Nunez is adept at capturing subtle frictions in the interactions between class, race and gender . . . [She] writes with sophisticated insight.

 
The Seattle Times
13/27

Sigrid Nunez has long been one of my favorite authors because she writes with the deepest intelligence, the truest heart, and the most surprising sense of humor.

 
—Gary Shteyngart, author of Lake Success and Super Sad True Love Story
14/27

Nunez’s writing is haunting and poignant . . . It is, in one word, unforgettable.

 
Travel + Leisure
15/27

The tender biography of a sickly marmoset that was adopted by Leonard Woolf and became a fixture of Bloomsbury society.

 
The New York Times
16/27

Nunez has a wry, withering wit.

 
—NPR
17/27

Nunez’s prose itself comforts us. Her confident and direct style uplifts—the music in her sentences, her deep and varied intelligence.

 
The New York Times Book Review
18/27

A crisply philosophical and undervalued novelist . . . Dry, allusive and charming . . . The snap of her sentences sometimes put me in mind of Rachel Cusk.

 
—Dwight Garner, The New York Times
19/27

Though it’s factually based on diaries, letters, and memoirs, Nunez’s Mitz: The Marmoset of Bloomsbury still offers a slice of pure whimsy.

 
Entertainment Weekly
20/27

Mitz succeeds charmingly in portraying the Woolfs’ companionable writerly routine (as well as their darker days), and in being sympathetic (but not sentimental) toward Leonard’s peculiar pet. Among the flurry of Bloomsbury books, Mitz stands out for taking a (Virginia) Woolf-like imaginative leap.

 
Hartford Courant
21/27

Mitz shimmers with an emotional truth missing from the most rigorous Bloomsbury histories.

 
The Village Voice, Editors’ Choice
22/27

Delight! Nunez is the absolute best. She is the only writer I know with enough delicacy, subtlety, intelligence, and wit to be a marmoset’s biographer. I adored this book, as small and as brilliant as that little star, Mitz, the marmoset herself. All this, and with it a splendid portrait of the two Woolfs, Leonard and Virginia, as well. I learned much that is important about marmosets and about the Bloomsbury group from Mitz, and for both insights, I’m grateful.

 
—Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of The Hidden Life of Dogs
23/27

An inventive, intelligent, thoroughly researched and alive creation . . . an absolutely miraculous achievement of intellectual imagination . . . Viva Mitz!

 
—Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones
24/27

A lesson to all of us who foolishly believed that Flush exhausted the unpromising genre of pet biography, Mitz takes Flush back to the muse, the marmoset that briefly belonged to Virginia and Leonard Woolf. In prose so lucid, so supple, so exquisitely entertaining we only slowly realize we are in the presence of art, Sigrid Nunez constructs a diagram of love and solicitude and abiding solitude: Mitz is tender, astute, wise, funny, and deeply, unsentimentally sad—for all its charm, a novel of masterly formal intelligence.

 
—From the citation for the 1999 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, American Academy of Arts and Letters
25/27

Nunez takes great risks with this novel . . . At its very best the book takes on the edginess of Mrs. Dalloway.

 
Chicago Tribune
26/27

Because I enjoyed The Friend so much, when this came across my desk, it really popped out, for a reason . . . [It’s a] lovely little edition . . . It’s a very lovely portrait of this time in their life, and this time in history . . . It’s a very well done, charming book that I would recommend as a palate cleanser . . . It’s just a beautiful thing if you’re looking for something to pick up and having a hard time choosing the next thing.

 
—John Williams, The Book Review (New York Times podcast)
27/27

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